As a small business owner, you are blazing an untouched trail. Perhaps there are other businesses of your nature in the market, but that does matter; you are charting something of your own from scratch. You’ll face daunting trials and a great deal of discouragement from your peers and others in the market because of that. It’s easy to fall into despair considering all of those negative things; and when that lets the wind out of your sails, it’s easy to lose motivation in your business — and then it fails. You don’t want to prove that negativity right. So here are three quick tips for staying positive about your business. Take stock of the good things. You’ll have many people telling you that your business isn’t worthwhile; especially in the early stages. Or if you don’t have people saying this, you’ll certainly have the market informing you of the fact, or your bank account. So it’s important to remind yourself of the highlights of your business, and take stock of your successes as they happen. The more you remind yourself of your victories, the smaller your failures will seem and you’ll feel the strength to push on. Write a small journal entry every night, detailing only what went right in your business. Start a private blog, where you catalog the highpoints to yourself and a few readers, who may end up encouraging you as well. Speak positivity. When you have a family member ask about the profits of your business, you’re not obligated to detail what figures you made in the week or month. A simple, “It’s been good,” is acceptable. This is a positive comment that reassures you as well as reassures them. Speak good things about your business. Don’t just remind yourself of the highpoints, talk about them and only focus on them. Yes, maybe a client threw you under the bus that day; but instead say, “I landed another deal.” Or, “My website is still doing well.” Speak positive things until you believe them. Talk to other business owners. The best way to feel confident about your business is to discuss someone else’s. It allows you to see outside your own sphere and realize that, yeah, clients throw other businesses under the bus too. Yes, other home-workers make pathetic wages for the month once in a while also. Of course other freelancers are criticized horribly over something that wasn’t their fault. You’re not alone, and this doesn’t mean the end of your business. Talk with others and vent your frustrations; they can give you sympathy or personal advice, which may end up benefiting your business. Creating a home business can be one of the best...